5 times eurobeat went right and wrong?

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para_rigby
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5 times eurobeat went right and wrong?

Post by para_rigby » Jan 5th, '17, 22:56

Love to hear your opinions of 5 time when eurobeat went right and 5 times it went wrong. This includes such things as particular songs, artists, productions, history of labels, etc. Anything is on the table for this one.

5 times eurobeat went right.
1. Playing with other genre influences. This mostly is towards SCP who has dabbled with other genres in eurobeat. Pamsy's debut song was the starter of this trend. Eurobeat has dabbled with disco (duh), 80s pop, rock, trance, dubstep, etc. Shun the non-believer that thinks you shouldn't do this!

2. GGM picking up where A-BEAT C left off. When GGM got onto SEB, it was a breath of fresh air and a continuation of that classic A-BEAT C sound, but with a new twist.

3. Sinclaire Style's "classic, but at the same time, contemporary" mood. Go back to when Bratt was with A-BEAT C and DELTA to hear his strong, wild synths. When SS came onto the scene, his still very much kept that vision, but updated it for a new generation of listeners.

4. Delta lyrics. I'm talking about their glory days before Newfield and Sinclaire left the label. That team was awesome at producing interesting lyrics that went far above and beyond what other labels were doing (a lot less about fire and desire than other labels).

5. The TIME renaissance. This is around the 160s-190s when the sounds were an absolute delight to listen to. Synths and melodies used in this era were, what I call, "carnival-esque". Melodies were catchy and even the 200X updated songs felt fresh and new.

5 TIMES EUROBEAT WENT WRONG
1. Sunfire. Oh, boy. I'm going to get a lot of hate, but this studio is totally devoid of anything of its former self (A-Beat C). Productions feel empty and don't care for artists like Rich Hard and Futura/Oceania.

2. The Post-Newfield Delta. Even after Sinclaire left Delta, Newfield had some pretty damn amazing productions. However, when Newfield left, Delta got stuck in this rut of sounds being repetitive and, frankly, uninspired. I think the last Delta track I liked was "Go Shinkansen!!" (202). The upside is the refreshing "I Love You From My Soul" track produced by Dr. G.

3. AVEX...We can really beat a dead horse, can't we? Avex really needs to make those digital releases a thing for the whole planet. As well, they need better promotion of the series.

4. The loss of former studios. See: Vibration, Time/Eurogrooves, and A-Beat C. Still sad to see these go away, btw.

5. Absent singers. Yes, eurobeat goes wrong when good artists don't sing anymore or on a long hiatus. See: Annie, Dany/Magika, Karen, Matt Land, Magnani, Mari-san, Betty Beat, etc.

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Post by #Infinity » Jan 6th, '17, 01:46

Top 5 Times Eurobeat Went Right:

1. Promoting itself through Initial D - Far and large, eurobeat after the italo era became a cult phenomenon because of its regular use in the Initial D anime. It's of no coincidence that SEB sales peaked early during the show's run. A huge chunk of overseas listeners also discovered eurobeat through Initial D after anime's western breakthrough in the late 90s. It's likely Super Eurobeat wouldn't have even existed today had Initial D not drastically expanded the series' audience.

2. Evolving as a genre - Considering eurobeat was originally just an offshoot of italo disco, hardly distinguishable from mainstream radio hits like "I Heard a Rumour" and "Touch Me (I Want Your Body)," it's pretty impressive how well the genre ultimately adapted after the 1980s came to an end. Sure, it was clearly going through some awkward growing pains around the early/mid-1990s, but the decision to synth it up, speed it up, and trim it up ultimately proved a risk that paid off. Even after turning into a completely idiosyncratic style of music by 1996, eurobeat continued to advance itself all the way through 2008.

3. SCP, Hi-NRG Attack, Vibration, and Saifam are introduced to Super Eurobeat - As much as Super Eurobeat produced a ton of countless classics from SEB 009 to SEB 139, the lack of numerous labels meant the series could get occasionally repetitive or full of filler. This became especially evident in the early 2000s, when Time Records lost so many of its former writers and producers and degenerated into an extremely hollow and uninteresting label that still occupied a third of each new album. Coming off several classic songs from Euromach, SCP, Hi-NRG Attack, and Vibration joined the SEB series in 2003, while Saifam would return to the series in 2005 (again in 2008), and the result was that series installments from volume 141 onwards were significantly more diverse and fresh than what had come before, even if they weren't always perfect. Personally, I prefer having more labels on a single album, which is why I've actually modified the older SEB albums on my iTunes library by replacing lesser/filler songs with SCP/HRG/Asia/Vibration ones that were made around the same time.

4. Delta's golden age - Though this was largely the result of Akyr Music's implosion, Delta got on an incredible kick that began late in the 160s and lasted roughly through the rest of the 2000s. The label had been suffering creatively around the mid-2000s, but a lot like Time Records in the late 1990s, Delta during the late 2000s had a broad assembly of different writers and producers who all brought fresh and original material to the label. In addition to Laurent Newfield, Delta songs were also produced by Roby Adruini, Morris Capaldi, Roberto Gabrielli, Cipiro & Sandrini, and occasionally Clara Moroni. It's a shame this high came to a screeching halt in 2010, with all producers departing the label except for Morris Capaldi, whose creations still sound exactly the same as they did when "Big Bad and Hot Love" and "Anyway, Anymore" were made near the end of 2007.

5. Hi-NRG Attack's independent albums - After several years of posting their enormous catalogue publicly but having most of their songs never seeing the light of day, Hi-NRG Attack finally began releasing all of their music independently in 2005. The result was countless gems from the late 90s and early and mid-2000s being newly released to fill in some of the void left by the transition from 18-track SEB albums to 13-track ones. Though HRG was a bit laconic about their independent compilations in 2006 and 2007, they got back to their senses in late 2008 and eventually released almost every single song they ever made through the 2000s. For fans of older eurobeat like myself, this was a godsend that certainly helped retain my interest in eurobeat for much longer.

Top 5 Times Eurobeat Went Wrong:

1. AVEX's disinterest in the series in recent years - It's no surprise that AVEX has become particularly notorious to this board over the past decade. Time and time again, they make choices that are difficult to comprehend, alienating more and more fans in the process. While I understand that Super Eurobeat's popularity has gradually diminished since its peak in 2000, the changes made to the series have gone from brilliant (adding new labels, including bonus discs) to downright infuriating (killing Time Records over a few songs that appeared on Farm compilations, delaying album releases, taking down Delta's Eurobeat Masters compilation series, having too much creative influence over the labels). If they were going to handle SEB's twilight years so clumsily, they should have just ended it a long time ago and allowed the former labels to just go their own way. I don't know if it's just an issue of cultural differences between Japan and the rest of the world, but it just really feels like AVEX has little sensitivity to SEB's tiny, frail fanbase.

2. Mu-Mo being changed to Morawin - I don't think I've ever been more outraged by a single business decision in the eurobeat industry than this egregious move. I discovered and checked out mu-mo.net around the start of 10th grade in 2008, and it was absolute heaven for me to be able to purchase extended tracks from almost all Super Eurobeat albums to date without going through the hassle of ordering a CD online. Come early 2009, and suddenly, Avex decides that their online shop should be kept as far away from dirty foreign wallets as possible, and ever since Morawin replaced Mu-Mo, only the Japanese have been allowed to enjoy the luxuries of downloadable purchases. It was the biggest middle finger ever given to eurobeat's international cult following. SEB was at least recently added to international iTunes, but it's still a no-show in the United States, which means I'm still stuck with pirated mp3's rather than purchased versions I would replace them with. Technically, this gripe falls under the same umbrella as my #1 choice, but it's such an atrocity that it deserves its own slot.

3. Saifam's jarring decline - For several years, Saifam was arguably the most consistent label in the eurobeat industry. Around 2005 and 2006, when they were reintroduced to Super Eurobeat, they reached a creative zenith, releasing masterpiece after masterpiece. After being briefly dropped starting with SEB 171, however, the quality of their work started to dip a little, becoming mostly average by 2008. Around the turn of 2009, after being reintroduced to SEB, it seemed like they were finally getting their groove back thanks to gems like "Technological World," "Ivanhoe," and "Superphenomena," but that all came to an end when not only did Mauro Farina stop regularly performing on new songs, but the vast bulk of Saifam's new eurobeat songs, now coming out at a sharply decreased rate, were pointless or embarrassing covers. On one hand, I can understand Mauro Farina being creatively burnt out since he had been musically active since 1981, but at the same time, he did not make enough of an effort to hire fresh new talent to continue Saifam's legacy. Even in the late 1990s, Farina was less active as a eurobeat artist, but his label remained fresh because of the additional writers, producers, and singers he brought aboard for a few years during that time, such as Roberto Gabrielli, O. Pizzoli, and Isabella Branca. It's too bad he didn't really encourage the same in the 2010s. They've had a few decent songs in recent times, but it's just not nearly the same anymore as it was in 2005.

4. The death of Time/Eurogrooves - Time Records had steadily been reestablishing their identity over the course of the 2000s, and even after they were slain by a legal dispute, they seemed promising upon their return as Eurogrooves Records on SEB 192. It's too bad this comeback lasted hardly more than a year, for after "Take This Way" on SEB 203, the label was pretty much completely retired, aside from a few j-euro covers and "healing" versions of older songs for a year longer. This label was never strong in the lyrics department, but their heavy-hitting, deeply layered productions added a muscle to the SEB series that has been direly missing ever since. Not a single soul from Eurogrooves has even migrated to a different label. The closest thing to Time/Eurogrooves surviving to this day is the occasional song by SCP that emulates their style, like Lou Master's "Up & Dance, Up & Go."

5. Unreleased songs - It's pretty clear that AVEX at this point treats Super Eurobeat with hardly any enthusiasm. The least they can do, however, is finally release the hundreds of old songs from first party labels that never saw the light of day. Like Hi-NRG Attack and Vibration before their respective compilation booms, A-Beat C, Time, SCP, and even GGM all have countless songs in their catalogues that have either never appeared in any format other than nonstop ("Hey Ho, Let's Go," "Midnight," "Zorro, Zorro," "Wind & Fire," etc.) or haven't even been released whatsoever ("Emoticons," "I'm Your Bad Boy Racer," and countless others). If eurobeat labels today are so fried or just stuck in 2008, I would think releasing more new songs made during the golden age of eurobeat would rekindle at least a bit of interest in both eurobeat's cult community, as well as its main Japanese community. If stuff like "Manga Super Robot," "Stay the Night," and "Breakin' Out" could blow up in Japan several years after they were first written, then I don't see why releasing the plethora of other forgotten eurobeat songs is a waste of time and effort, either. I'm disappointed that it's now 2017 and I'm still waiting for AVEX to finally capitulate over this matter.
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Post by Lebon14 » Jan 6th, '17, 04:47

#Infinity wrote:1. AVEX's disinterest in the series in recent years - [...] to downright infuriating (killing Time Records over a few songs that appeared on Farm compilations, delaying album releases, taking down Delta's Eurobeat Masters compilation series[...]
Over this matter, I'm going to say just this: Avex has nothing to do with it. It's just an assumption we all had at the time. However, Matteo Rizzi told me that it was not because of Avex. Unfortunately, I cannot tell you more than that as I promised not to tell. If you are curious, I'll let you ask him on facebook.

As for my lists... I think you both above pretty much hit bull's eye on mostly anything I could have come up with. I can't add anything else.
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Post by drnrg » Jan 6th, '17, 06:25

5 TIMEs is went right.

1. Evolving into the faster style of today. Now while I'm on the fence about it speeding up too quickly. I still think the golden age 91-93 was when the songs sounded the and had the best intros and breaks; I still believe that with the loss of labels like Flea, High Energy, Disco Energy; the genre really didn't have much choice but too speed up the BPMs to keep the same rehashed melodies sounding fresh.

2. Live music team of Rimonti, Accantino and Gabrielle joining up with TIME. Not only did it give the label a new rebirth, but it gave TIME records catalog; some of their best known classics..and in the course of TIME; the birth of HRG Attack. My #3. could actually be the Birth of HRG Attack, but i'll include that in my #2.

3. DELTA records. As the music was changing. Newfield decided it was TIME to start his own label. He also took advantage of perfect timing; just like Pasquinni did when he started ABeatC. Newfield took one of the frontline female singers at TIME records; Clara Moroni; who was also showing great writing abilities and Bratt Sinclaire; one of the new premier fuerzas at AbeatC ,along with Nando Bonini, and a few others and again revamped the genre for a 4rth TIME.

4. HRG Attack going full Italo and slowing down the BPMs to an Italo Disco level. Some of my favorite songs of that era came about from that short lived but effective experiment.

5. Euromach. Not that I'm a fan of Mixes nor anything like that, the birth of a new CD compilation with no less than 20 new songs on each volume; meant that many more songs were being produced. Especially from HRG Attack. For what could easily be called their "Golden Age" in Eurobeat.


5 TIMEs it got it wrong.

1. The cancellation of TIME/Eurogrooves from SEB. Much goes to the fact that Mr. Sergio Dall Ora actually thought it was TIME to retire and enjoy the fruits of his labor throughout the years, but I strongly believe he could have left in charge Gambogi or DeLeo; maybe even Ferritti to keep the label going. We maybe could have had something like a Post Newfield Delta still going on with a post Dall' Ora Eurogrooves. I still think someone should pick up with the label name TIME were Dall Ora left off. A complete revamp of the Label would be awesome.

2. Death of Gino Caria. I know this is out of anyones hands, but for me Losing Gino Caria was losing one of Eurobeat's Premier Voaclists, Writers and Producers of the genre. So its more like Eurobeat Destiny got it wrong here.

3. Stop pressing Vinyl. I bitch about this always and will till my death. One of the best things about this genre was also the cool vinyl sleeve covers that came with the songs. Even more is that fact that every song was tangible to me. Sure the cds are tangible too, but something about every song having it's own cover art made them come to life on my turn table. Plus I could grab any two records and mix them to my liking.

4. Songs becoming too short. Or in other words: The death of the true Extended. More and more songs are getting shorter and shorter. We've gone from some amazing; 6:00 + to 5:30(still great length. To even shorter of 5:00. Even a 4:30 song can still sound good if the prodution is crafty. Delta and HRG Attack did some 4:15 during the 170-190 era that still had all the essentials. Even a sort of mini break. The loss of the long midbreak; also meant ; losing one of the essential parts of a Eurobeat song. To me it was like the guitar solo of Rock music. Which to my astonishment has also been eliminated in much of today's rock songs. Now we got SCP and at TIMEs Sun Fire dishing out these 4:00 songs that leave much much to be desired.

5. Full Extendeds not avaliable. This has been a pressing issue for years. Who is too blame here? Avex? The Labels? Thank goodness we have Juno where we can obtain full extended from Former labels like Vibration and other classics from HRG Attack, Saifam, as well as Vibration sub-lables. I think there should really be a source where one can purchase all Extendeds if he or she pleases without having to resort to ripping from Youtube all the TIME.

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Post by #Infinity » Jan 6th, '17, 07:54

Lebon14 wrote:
#Infinity wrote:1. AVEX's disinterest in the series in recent years - [...] to downright infuriating (killing Time Records over a few songs that appeared on Farm compilations, delaying album releases, taking down Delta's Eurobeat Masters compilation series[...]
Over this matter, I'm going to say just this: Avex has nothing to do with it. It's just an assumption we all had at the time. However, Matteo Rizzi told me that it was not because of Avex. Unfortunately, I cannot tell you more than that as I promised not to tell. If you are curious, I'll let you ask him on facebook.
Strange that they were never taken off of Amazon, then. With that information, I'm certainly curious what the whole big deal was, but I'll also respect the confidentiality of the matter.
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Post by Lebon14 » Jan 6th, '17, 20:27

#Infinity wrote:Strange that they were never taken off of Amazon, then. With that information, I'm certainly curious what the whole big deal was, but I'll also respect the confidentiality of the matter.
If it was Avex, it wouldn't still be on Amazon. ;)
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Post by Bonkers » Jan 6th, '17, 21:31

5 times Right:

1. Independent non-stop series: The Euromach albums were pure gold, and really took eurobeat in a positive direction after Eurobeat Flash ended. The mixing was as top notch as eurobeat can be mixed, and the showcase of labels was refreshing. These albums catered more to the party audience, that's for sure.

2. Energetic Construction: Most eurobeat, up til 2010, had such energetic construction. The bass lines were driving, the drum samples were stompy, and the synth options were varied in sound, and chaos. Another factor was the tempo. Where did all the 160 bpm+ energy go? Hi-NRG Attack & 3B, and dare I say, Delta, use to churn out so many great 160 bpm+ tracks.

3. Variety of labels: Eurobeat as a genre was doing good in the late 90s-2007 with all the labels churning out tunes.

4. Variety of melodies: Happy/cheese, serious/trance, disco, and plan out weird...all of these sounds were present in eurobeat just a few years ago.

5. SinclaireStyle as his own label: The man writes anthem after anthem, and always has the chaos factor in his tracks! His melodies are also interesting and unique.

5 times Wrong:

1. 2015-2016 Hi-NRG Attack: I don't know what was going on behind the scenes at the label, but their productions during this time were very same-sounding, and just didn't carry over the energy and chaos pre-2014 Hi-NRG Attk did. Where did the chipmunk/Forceful vocals & cheesy melodies go? Where did the rebellious chaotic riffs & raw drums go? Where did those Russian themed tracks go? Where did that 160 bpm+ go? I always regarded Hi-NRG Attk to being one of the front runners of the genre. That's not to say they haven't given us some great tracks during this time as well: Their Hot Milk, 233 & 241 entries were ACE!

2. SCP's lack of cheese & synths: Same with SCP, where did all their cheesy productions go? Scream Team, Kiki & Fancy, Christine, Bubbles. And also, where did their more chaotic/loud riffs go? Go back just a few years to 200/08, and they had that great synth that was loud and hi-pitched.

3. GGM lack of production: GGM was a top label when they hit the SEB series, and up to through 2011. Domino is hardly present, No Go Go Girls tracks, vocalists have left...The only truly active person seems to be Manuel, but even his tracks just don't have the energy they use to when he worked with ABeatC.

4. Dima: The guy wrote amazing tracks when he was with Vibration. It seems that rough & cheesy energy left after 2009 (King of The World/Fever of Love). Every now and then he gives us a great female track, but his male entries are just so non-eurobeat sounding.

5. Lack of side series: It would be nice to have another hyper/party non-stop side series again, or a series devoted to newer labels.

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Post by Crockett » Feb 18th, '17, 19:41

para_rigby wrote:4. The loss of former studios. See: Vibration, Time/Eurogrooves, and A-Beat C. Still sad to see these go away, btw.
Less big labels or more small labels. Surely the most important are artists and what they do. Individual point of view. Let’s stay in this place. But things go in a new, not exactly good direction, when a serious record company became little limited virtual label.
para_rigby wrote:5. Absent singers. Yes, eurobeat goes wrong when good artists don't sing anymore or on a long hiatus.
Well, we can separate two groups of vocalists, these who have significantly devoted to sing in Eurobeat and these who were just brought guests.
#Infinity wrote:Top 5 Times Eurobeat Went Right:

2. Evolving as a genre
General evolution this is already deep past for me.

Modification from the format 8 – 12 maximum tracks to 18, and back to 15 with simultaneous cutting the duration isn’t evolution.

It’s an effort to match up increasing number of labels, again with simultaneous decreasing number of CDs.

Could be also the effort to match up to radio format.

I consider this as transformation to the wholesale musical product, which that way was loosing an identity.

In practise more, more, more, target – quantity, meet the requirements similar to mainstream. So no time for making really new, fresh idea or just focusing to refine, to improve the current, began idea. Overall result a lack of variations, can't be positive.

If regardless of everything this rescued somehow the genre, I will be ok…

But a connoisseur even of the banal dance music respects, appreciates separately each single piece, and 5-6 minutes are absolutely minimum of the duration. Intro, outro, extra instrumental parts, riffs, these are dead features on wider tracklist.

It’s also related with the independence of artists and labels. I know I’m telling theory in case of Eurobeat in Japan, something what will not back, but this is not unreal at all in the music industry.

Someone stands over you and dictates what you should write, what lyrics, how should be BPM rate and riff – that’s absolutely no evolution as well, no independence first of all. The creativity becomes limited, composer stuck.

No problem actually as long, as these who stand over you still care about any evolution.

Sometimes I want to say loud - big respect to Eurobeat ex-producers, who said “The end” in proper for them, or in proper moment for the genre.

The worst would be, if the artist would say “Stop” on everything. Any of them has choice, talent and can continue passion on different ways still of course in music.

Just for each of them there is no constraint and loss of "honor" to change the genre or back to previous genre for example. They have done enough work.

If these all matters of Eurobeat evolution I listed would be perfect, if having so many songs non-stop without changes since several years already would be correct, just on order of Avex Trax - if such situation would be a determinant of the best interpretation of music and eminence, this genre would be worldwide successful and earning millions.

But the reality even in Japan is exactly the opposite nowadays.

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Post by Crockett » Feb 19th, '17, 15:44

My personal summary of things, which went right and wrong:

The late 80’s and whole 90's were the periods of true evolution, even audible volume by volume ! The storm of compilation series, albums, projects and producers, vocalists, who didn’t give up after Italo Disco.

The 2000's was the time of freshness, experiments, mixing, rehash – tests. Interesting indeed !

But this period was also very unstable and getting quickly down like around the world. Some new seasonal unknown artists were brought. So pretty understandable were decisions to leave the scene by producers whose ambitions were different, who were aware what meant “art” of composing previously. And these who stayed had to create the small labels and being at the mercy of Avex Trax.

Domino words: Although Dave finished songs, he spent all night to change and correct details only just to satisfy Avex Trax………. Years later to satisfy DJ Boss.

So where is the real evolution now ?... Rhetorical question.

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Re: 5 times eurobeat went right and wrong?

Post by Kat » Mar 19th, '17, 16:11

90s/early 2000 Eurobeat is my favorite era.
I love the sound of it BUT the newest Eurobeat volumes are also very interesting and I appreciate them
I prefer high speed songs.Hi-NRG that's what I like in Eurobeat because it can be so fast as crazy and as slow as italo disco (I love it!)
Old Eurobeat is also very fascinating
I love the use of guitar riffs in the songs

Things I hate about Eurobeat is that many songs have shorter versions on SEB's and not the extended ones.You have to search and find the extended version.But I think this is also a good thing because I love as much versions as possible.
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When the disco is open

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